A Day In The Park Monfrague National Park Wild Spain Custom Tour 25 April Day 3



Black Vulture trim

A day filled with fantastic birds of prey - Cinereous Vulture, formerly known as Black Vulture.



Another day another blue sky and glorious sunshine and we headed north to spend the whole day in the Monfrague National Park famous for it’s birds of prey and so much more. We zipped along to reach the park fairly early and we were rewarded with stunning views of the Griffon Vulture colony as these giants of the bird world rose off the cliff in the morning sun. Cameras were very busy indeed as some these massive vultures passed pretty close to us and some at and even below eye-level allowing the best possible views. Both Cinereous and Egyptian Vultures also put in an appearance along with two Peregrine Falcon that looked tiny amongst the vultures. But there was more – Black Storks were nesting on the same cliff face and we watched gorgeous Blue Rock Thrushes on the boulders just below us along with Rock Buntings, Black Redstarts, Serins, Red-rumped Swallows and Crag Martins – what a wonderful start to the day!

Pena Falcon Rock

Next stop produced huge and fantastic Alpine Swifts zooming low overhead along with masses of nesting House Martins and the beautiful sound of singing Golden Orioles.

Coffee and cake went down very well indeed and we were able to watch nesting Barn Swallows at the café as more vultures drifted over head! Next stop a viewpoint overlooking cliffs where we had previously seen Bonelli’s Eagles and amazingly as we step out into the sunshine we saw two of these rare and hard to find eagles above us! What timing! We also enjoyed super views of a singing male Western Subalpine Warbler and a perched Black Kite in an cork oak.

Another cliff and more raptors and we timed it, again, perfectly for a wonderful view of a magnificent Spanish Imperial Eagle against the blue sky yet another wow moment! The golden head and white “shoulders” gleaming in the sunshine what an awesome bird! A nearby café again provided a superb tapas lunch as we sat outside and watched more birds. A male Woodchat Shrike posed for us as Iberian Magpies hopped about under the cork oak trees. White and Black Storks soared overhead along with Short-toed Snake Eagle and Booted Eagle. Another stroke of luck here when a Rock Sparrow, another tricky species to find, was spotted under the oaks what a wonderful place for lunch. After our lovely and long late lunch we headed back through the park stopping to admire the vultures again and the stunning scenery before heading back to base.

Another wonderful day on our custom-made Wild Spain tour! We would love to arrange a custom Birdwatching Trips tour for you or you and a small group, maximum of six guests, anywhere you would love to enjoy great birds. Just drop us a line here and we can do the rest…

info@birdwatchingtrips.co.uk

We have run our special custom tours to many destination here in the UK and overseas including Spain, Finland, Borneo, Ecuador, South Africa so just ask and we can help.



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